How to Create Simple and Effective Instructional Designs

Kesha Dougan
Posted: June 5, 2018

As we know, often times less is MORE! This, of course, can apply to many areas of instructional design, as well as life in general!

Related: Webinar Recap: How to Design Your PowerPoint Slides like a Pro

For today, let’s focus on one specific aspect. Go take a peek at any design project you are working on right now. Close your eyes, clear your brain, and then open your eyes. Consider the following:

  1. What is the first thing that catches your eye?
  2. Is it the most important thing on the page?
  3. Is it distracting from what’s on the page?

Let the answers be your guide. Then ask yourself these questions to help you decide how to tweak. And remember — less is more.

  • Is the design too busy?
  • Are there conflicting visual styles (clipart, photos, etc.)?
  • Can you condense the written content to bullet points or lists?
  • Is the overall design pleasant to look at and learn from?
  • Can info be condensed in a fun infographic?

The goal of this quick activity is to visually simplify. With too many design elements, sometimes the most important content can be missed! Do somethingto simplify it and make a greater impact with what is remaining.

If you’d like to learn more about how to get creative with color palettes and utilize graphic design techniques within restrictive brand standards, tune in to our recent webinar on How to Design Your PowerPoint Slides like a Pro!


About the Author

Kesha has been in the learning industry for over 20 years helping companies and individuals reach their highest potential. Helping companies create training solutions to match the needs of the learner is a true passion of hers. She is a true creative person and brings her out-of-the box thinking and can-do spirit into everything she does. Her philosophy is to be open to change and willing to take risks that produce breakthrough performance. Her favorite quote is from Audrey Hepburn – Nothing is impossible; the word itself says “I’m possible!”